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EU beef production and exports forecast to rise in 2015


EU beef production and exports forecast to rise in 2015  According to the latest report released by the United States Department of Agriculture (FAS-USDA), the EU beef production and export are forecast to increase through 2015. Beef shipments are also expected to rise, while, in contrast, domestic consumption is expected to plateau. The dairy herd expansion is expected to take place mainly in northern Europe; the UK, Ireland, Germany, the Benelux, the Nordic Countries, Poland and France. In most other EU member states, the dairy herd is shrinking due to the phasing out of government support programs and increased competition on the EU domestic market. Beef production (EU-28) is estimated to total 7.47 million tonnes cwt in 2014, up 1.2% on the previous year. Despite the Russian ban on EU fresh and frozen beef (as part of the sanctions on a wide range of agricultural products in August last year), beef shipments during the first eleven months of 2014 rose 27% year-on-year, to 170,087 tonnes swt (GTA/Eurostat), and exports are expected to remain strong in 2015. The increase can be partially explained by the tight global beef supply and the strong demand from markets outside the EU. Source: MLA

March 16th, 2015

Romanian meat prices could drop by 20 percent


Romanian meat prices could drop by 20 percentThe recent draft of Romania's new tax code states that the VAT on meat, fish, vegetables and fruit will be lowered from 24 percent to nine percent, starting in 2016. If the draft is passed into law than the lobbying action of the Romanian Meat Association (ARC) will be proven successful. The Romanian meat industry has been struggling to find new markets for their products, due to a lack of exports to Russia because of economic sanctions. The measure could led to a 20 percent drop in consumer meat prices. Source: TheCattleSite

March 3rd, 2015

China aiming for self-sufficiency


China aiming for self-sufficiencyThe Chinese government has enacted several targeted subsidies to reach self-sufficiency in domestic food production. Larger farms and mechanisation are believed to reduce the need for food imports. This policy tends to focus on grains, oilseeds and potatoes because of their direct or indirect importance to Chinese consumers. Meat and livestock products are not supported to the same extent as grains and oilseeds, and different factors have contributed to import growth. While the traditional source of protein in China is pig meat, income growth and urbanisation have contributed to increased demand for meat and dairy products. Food safety concerns, such as those highlighted by the melamine in baby formula scandal, have also contributed to increased consumer preference for imports. Chinese imports of dairy and meat have increased almost 10-fold between 2004 and 2013. Without considerable productivity growth in these industries, imports are likely to continue to grow. china-voedselimporten Source: The Meat Site

February 23rd, 2015

Chicken from Brazil, Argentina and Ukraine competitive in Europe


Chicken from Brazil, Argentina and Ukraine competitive in EuropeChicken from a certain number of non-EU countries is already competitive in Europe, despite import tariffs. The EU is now negotiating with a number of these countries to lower or even remove import tariffs. Producers from Brazil, Argentina and Ukraine could offer their products far below market prices if import tariffs were to drop with 50%, according to research of LEI Wageningen UR.

February 16th, 2015

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EU beef production and exports forecast to rise in 2015


EU beef production and exports forecast to rise in 2015  According to the latest report released by the United States Department of Agriculture (FAS-USDA), the EU beef production and export are forecast to increase through 2015. Beef shipments are also expected to rise, while, in contrast, domestic consumption is expected to plateau. The dairy herd expansion is expected to take place mainly in northern Europe; the UK, Ireland, Germany, the Benelux, the Nordic Countries, Poland and France. In most other EU member states, the dairy herd is shrinking due to the phasing out of government support programs and increased competition on the EU domestic market. Beef production (EU-28) is estimated to total 7.47 million tonnes cwt in 2014, up 1.2% on the previous year. Despite the Russian ban on EU fresh and frozen beef (as part of the sanctions on a wide range of agricultural products in August last year), beef shipments during the first eleven months of 2014 rose 27% year-on-year, to 170,087 tonnes swt (GTA/Eurostat), and exports are expected to remain strong in 2015. The increase can be partially explained by the tight global beef supply and the strong demand from markets outside the EU. Source: MLA

March 16th, 2015

Romanian meat prices could drop by 20 percent


Romanian meat prices could drop by 20 percentThe recent draft of Romania's new tax code states that the VAT on meat, fish, vegetables and fruit will be lowered from 24 percent to nine percent, starting in 2016. If the draft is passed into law than the lobbying action of the Romanian Meat Association (ARC) will be proven successful. The Romanian meat industry has been struggling to find new markets for their products, due to a lack of exports to Russia because of economic sanctions. The measure could led to a 20 percent drop in consumer meat prices. Source: TheCattleSite

March 3rd, 2015

China aiming for self-sufficiency


China aiming for self-sufficiencyThe Chinese government has enacted several targeted subsidies to reach self-sufficiency in domestic food production. Larger farms and mechanisation are believed to reduce the need for food imports. This policy tends to focus on grains, oilseeds and potatoes because of their direct or indirect importance to Chinese consumers. Meat and livestock products are not supported to the same extent as grains and oilseeds, and different factors have contributed to import growth. While the traditional source of protein in China is pig meat, income growth and urbanisation have contributed to increased demand for meat and dairy products. Food safety concerns, such as those highlighted by the melamine in baby formula scandal, have also contributed to increased consumer preference for imports. Chinese imports of dairy and meat have increased almost 10-fold between 2004 and 2013. Without considerable productivity growth in these industries, imports are likely to continue to grow. china-voedselimporten Source: The Meat Site

February 23rd, 2015

Chicken from Brazil, Argentina and Ukraine competitive in Europe


Chicken from Brazil, Argentina and Ukraine competitive in EuropeChicken from a certain number of non-EU countries is already competitive in Europe, despite import tariffs. The EU is now negotiating with a number of these countries to lower or even remove import tariffs. Producers from Brazil, Argentina and Ukraine could offer their products far below market prices if import tariffs were to drop with 50%, according to research of LEI Wageningen UR.

February 16th, 2015

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